JAPAN TEMPLES

Japan Temples Guide including detailed guides to Tokyo Temples and Kyoto Japan Temples. For a detailed guide see our page on Japanese Temples.
 

Japan Temples - Byodoin

Japan Temples - Byodoin

JAPAN TEMPLES LIST

Japan Temples Listed by alphabetical order. Japan Temples listed below with yellow background are UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Anrakuji Temple

Anrakuji Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is very popular in cherry blossom season, early summer for its azaleas and its Autumn leaves of red and orange. Anrakuji Temple Kyoto is along Kyoto's Philosopher's Walk. Anrakuji Temple was the training temple of the priest Honen (1133-1212). The consorts of Cloister Emperor Gotoba, Matsumushi and Suzumushi, left the palace to become Buddhist nuns. Matsumushi and Suzumushi were greatly moved by his disciples Oren and Anraku. Enraged the cloister emperor ordered the execution of the two priests and exiled Honen. In 1681 the Anrakuji Temple was founded and dedicated to the souls of executed priests. The wooden statues of Oren, Anraku, Matsumushi and Suzmushi remind visitors of that tragedy. On July 25 every year the temple serves its famous 'Kabocha-kuyo' or plates of pumpkin to visitors, as they are believed to prevent palsy.

Bentendo Hall Temple

Bentendo Hall Temple is a Benzaiten Temple on an island in the the middle of Shinobazu Pond, which forms part of Ueno Park Tokyo. Bentendo Hall Temple was constructed in the early 17th century by Mizunoya Katsutaka, a feudal lord. The current Bentendo Hall Temple was built in 1958 after the original temple building was destroyed by allied bombing in 1945.

Bokugoan

Bokugoan, also known as Ho-o-ji Temple, is a Buddhist temple that was originally established in Nagaokakyo-shi in the 6th century. Bokugoan was moved several times before 1888, when it was placed on its current site next to Nanzenji Temple in Kyoto. Bokugoan is a sub temple of Nanzenji Temple. Bokugoan features a small Japanese promenade garden just inside the front gate of the temple, which the public can often see through the gate. This garden looks particularly beautiful when the Autumn leaves are red and orange.

Byodoin Temple

Byodoin Temple is a famous Buddhist temple which appears on the 10 Yen coin. Byodoin Temple is in tea making area of Uji near Kyoto. Byodoin Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing.

Chion-in Temple

Chion-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is the head temple for the Buddhist sect of Jodo Shu (Pure Land) and was established by Honen in 1234. Chion-in Temple is within a large compound which today is next to Maruyama Park in Kyoto. Chion-in Temple features the largest surviving Sanmon (gate) in Japan which was built in 1619 and is a National Treasure. Most other buildings were rebuilt under the orders of Tokugawa Iemitsu after being destroyed by fire in 1633.

Chishakuin Temple

Chishakuin Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Shingon sect which was moved from Wakayama to the Higashiyama area of Kyoto in 1585. Chishakuin Temple is the first temple on the Kyoto Jusan Butsu pilgrimage. Chishakuin Temple is most famous for its traditional Japanese garden.

Chisho-in Temple

Chisho-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Chisho-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Choko-in Temple

Choko-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Choko-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Chorakuji Temple

Chorakuji Temple is a Buddhist temple in the Higashiyama Ward in Kyoto. Chorakuji Temple is famous for its bright red and orange leaves in Autumn. Chorakuji Temple was established in 805AD by Saicho at the request of Emperor Kammu. The principle artifact is an image of Kannon Bosatsu, which hisorically was only on show during special times.

Choukei-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Choukei-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Chusonji Temple is a Tendai Buddhist temple in Hiraizumi Iwate Prefecture. The Golden Hall (Konjiki-do) is one of the two buildings to survive from the original Chusonji Temple complex. Konjiki-do is a wooden building covered with gold leaf and mother of peral, which contains the mummified remains of the Northern Fujiwara clan who ruled northen Honshu in the 12th century. Chusonji Temple is designated as a Special Place of Scenic Beauty and a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments and Sites of Hiraizumi" listing.

Daianji Temple

Daianji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Tofukuji school of the Rinzai Sect, is in Sakai Osaka Prefecture. Daianji Temple was established in the Oei era (1394-1428), is famous for its main hall which features an independent room in the Shoin Zukuri style and wall paintings. These are both designated Important Cultural Properties.

Daiganji Temple

Daiganji Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is next to Itsukushima Shrine on the island of Miyajima. Daiganji Temple is an ancient Shingon Buddhist temple with strong ties to Shinto Shrines. Daiganji Temple used to be in full charge of the repair and construction of temples and shrines including Itsukushima Shrine. Daiganji Temple is dedicated to Benzaiten, the goddess of eloquence, music, and wealth, and enshrines one of the three most famous Benzaiten statues in Japan in addition to many other valuable Buddhist statues.

Daigoji Temple

Daigoji Temple is famous for its five storied pagoda, cherry blossom viewing in spring and a traditional Japanese garden. Daigoji Temple is part of a large Japanese Temple complex and is a designated Special Place of Scenic Beauty and a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing. Daigoji Temple is the main temple of the Shingon sect Daigo School. Daigoji Temple was founded about mid-9th century with a few simple structures on a mountaintop. In 926 the Kondo (main hall), Gojunoto (five-storied pagoda) and other structures were added. All were destroyed during various wars with the exception of the pagoda. The temple was rebuilt as a result of Toyotomi Hideyoshi's cherry blossom viewing party in 1598. The Gojunoto, Kondo and Yakushi-do are National Treasures and figure among the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto".

Daiho-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Daiho-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Daiji-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto.

Daikakuji Temple

Daikakuji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Esoteric sect, in Saga Kyoto, which was once a detached palace belonging to Emperor Saga. In 876AD it was converted to a temple by his daughter Empress Seishi. Daikakuji Temple is famous for its fusuma paintings from the Momoyama period and several cultural treasures it possesses. Daikakuji Temple is most famous for its Japanese Pond Garden (chisen-shoyu-teien or shinden-zukuri), which is one of only two in Japan.

Daiko-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto.

Dairyu-in Temple

Dairyu-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Dairyu-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Daisenin Temple

Daisenin Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto. Daisenin Temple is famous for its rock garden, which is a designated Special Place of Scenic Beauty. Unfortunately Daisenin Temple no longer allows photography including ANY cameras in the section with the garden.

Daishin-in Temple

Daishin-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Daishin-in Temple is one of the few Myoshinji Sub Temples which is normally open to the public.

Daishoin Temple

Daishoin Temple is an ancient Shingon Buddhist temple built at the foot of the sacred Mt Misen on the island of Miyajima. During the time of fusion period of Shintoism and Buddhism, this distinguished temple governed all priests in Miyajima and was in charge of religious ceremonies of Itsukushima Shrine.

Daitokuji Temple

Daitokuji Temple is a large temple complex with 22 sub-temples including some with famous Japanese gardens. Daitokuji Temple is well known and recognised for its beauty and is a designated Special Place of Scenic Beauty. Daitokuji Temple features a very large Sanmon (main gate - Important Cultural Property), Butsuden (Buddha Hall - Important Cultural Property), Hatto (Dharma Hall - Important Cultural Property), Hojo (Abbot's Quarters - National Treasure), Yokushitsu (Bath House), Karamon (Chinese Gate - National Treasure), Chokushimon (Imperial Messenger Gate) and Kyozo (Sutra Library). The Karamon (Chinese Gate) was moved to Daitokuji Temple from Fushimi Castle and the Chokushimon (Imperial Messenger Gate) came from the Imperial Palace grounds. Daitokuji Temple was established in 1315, however most of the buildings were re-built at a later date after they were destroyed by fire.

Daitsu-in Temple

Daitsu-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Daitsu-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Daiyu-in Temple

Daiyu-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Daiyu-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Dempoin Temple is a Buddhist temple close to Sensoji Temple, in the Asakusa District of Taito Ward of Tokyo. Dempoin Temple is not normally open to the public, but it does contain a Japanese garden with a pond which has a design similar to Katsura Imperial Villa in Kyoto.

Denzuin Temple, formally known as Muryozan Denzuin Jikyuji Temple, is a Buddhist temple in Bunkyo Tokyo. Denzuin Temple was built by Tokugawa Ieyasu and dedicated it to his mother. Kafu Nagai, a Japanese novelist, placed his story in Denzuin Temple.

Dojuin Temple

Dojuin Temple is a Buddhist temple in Kyoto, which is a sub temple of Tofukuji Temple. Dojuin Temple features a moss garden.

Eikando Zenrin-ji Temple

Eikando Zenrinji Temple is a Buddhist temple, in Kyoto, which is famous for its bright red and orange Autumn leaves and for its prominence in the past as a center of learning. Eikando Zenrinji Temple is a classic Japanese Temple.

Engakuji Temple

Engakuji Temple, one of the most important Zen Buddhist temples, was established in 1282 and is in Kamakura. Engakuji Temple is a large complex with eighteen building in total. Engakuji Temple contains several items designated National Treasures including the Shariden (Reliquary Hall) and the Great Bell.

Enjo-ji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Shingon sect in north eastern Nara. Enjo-ji Temple is believed to have been established in 756AD. The two oldest structures at Enjo-ji Temple, which are both designated Important Cultural Properties, are the two story gate built in 1468 and the Hondo in 1472. There are several associated Shinto shrines on the site including the designated National Treasures: Kasugado and Hakusando built in 1227. In addition, the Holden of the Uagajin Shrine is a designated Important Cultural Property and dates back to the end of the Kamakura Period. Enjo-ji Temple also features one of the few remaining "Pure Land" or Paradise style Japanese gardens, which is a designated Place of Scenic Beauty.

Enjoji Temple is a Buddhist temple that was established by Monk Nichinin in 1630. The object of enshrinement at Enjoji Temple is a two meter tall Iwato-Myoken-Daibosatsu (bodhisattva) with a sword in his right hand and a snake in his left hand standing on a big turtle. Enjoji Temple also features Iwato Waterfall, which is a training waterfall for monks. Enjoji Temple is believed to be the place where deceased spirits gather, therefore taking photos is not allowed. Enjoji Temple is in Kita Ward Kyoto.

Enryakuji Temple

Enryakuji Temple is a Buddhist temple, which was established in 788 on Mt Hiei, where it looks over Kyoto. Enryakuji Temple expanded over the years to become a large temple complex and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing.

Entsuin Temple

Entsuin Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is famous for a painting of a Western-style rose that is said to be the oldest in Japan. Entsuin Temple is in Matsushima and is designated as an Important National Cultural Asset.

Entsuji temple is a Buddhist temple of the Renzai sect which is famous for its Japanese gardens including one featuring the borrowed landscape style . Entsuji temple was established in 1678 on the site of a former Imperial Villa in northern Kyoto. Entsuji temple does not allow pictures to be taken of or inside the buildings.

Eshin-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, that was originally established by Kobo Daishi under the name of Ryusenji Temple on its current location on the eastern bank of the Uji River in Uji (Kyoto Prefecture). After the temple fell into disuse, it was reestablished by the Buddhist Priest Genshin in the Heian Period. Genshin is said to be the model for character "Yokawa no Sozu" in "The Tale of Genji".

Fudarakusanji Temple is Buddhist temple from the Tendai sect, in the Higashimuro District of Wakayama Prefecture. Fudarakusanji Temple features a venerated thousand armed kannon. Fudarakusanji Temple is believed to have been established around the 4th century by Ragyo Shonin, a monk from India. Fudarakusanji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Sacred Sites and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range" listing.

Fukuju-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Fukuju-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Funda-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Tofukuji Temple and within the same complex in Kyoto. Funda-in Temple is famous for its dry landscape Japanese garden which was designed by Sesshu Toyo around 1460 making it one of the oldest of the dry landscape (karesansui) gardens in Kyoto.

Gangoji Temple

Gangoji Temple is a Buddhist temple was established in 588 as part of Asuka-dera. In 718 it was moved to Nara and became one of the Seven Great Temples of Nara. Gangoji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara" listing.

Ganjoji Temple, also known as Shiramizu Amidado, is a Buddhist temple in Iwaki Fukushima Prefecture. The Amidado building of Ganjoji Temple was built in 1160 by Princess Tokuhime of Northern Fujiwara and is a designated National Treasure. The site including the Amidado building and its related paradise garden are a designated Historic Site. The Amidado contains five statues, with the three wooden ones; Amida Nyorai triad, Jikokuten and Tamonten, all dating to the Heian period and designated as Important Cultural Properties.

Genko-an Temple

Genko-an Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Soto sect of Zen Buddhism in the Kita Ward of Kyoto. Genko-an Temple is famous for its two windows that look out at the temple's Japanese garden. One window is round (The Window of Enlightenment) and the other square (The Window of Confusion), even though they provide an almost identical view, the view appears very different to the viewer. Genko-an Temple was originally a hermitage constructed by the head priest of Daitokuji Temple. Genko-an Temple also features the "Blood Ceiling", which was constructed from the floorboards taken from Fushimi Castle when it was being disassembled.

Genkoji Temple

Genkoji Temple is a Buddhist temple, which was established by Jokyo (Buddhism priest) in 1514 in what is now the outer suburbs of Kobe. Before then, there was a house which was used as a model in the Japanese famous novel called 'The Tale of Genji'. Genkoji Temple was destroyed by Great Hanshin Earthquake in 1995

Ginkakuji Temple - Silver Pavilion

Ginkaku-ji - Silver Pavilion is a Buddhist temple, that was built in the style of the Golden Pavilion, but was never completed with a matching cover of silver. Ginkaku-ji features some of the most beautiful Japanese gardens in Kyoto. Ginkaku-ji is a designated Special Place of Scenic Beauty and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing.

Gokokuji Temple is a Buddhist temple which was founded in 1367 in what is now Naha Okinawa. Gokokuji Temple was a major temple of Chuzan Kingdom and the Ryukyu Kingdom, but was also later associated with the Christian missionary Dr Bernard Bettelheim and Commodore Matthew Perry in 1853 to 1854.

Gokokuji Temple

Gokoku-ji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Bunkyo central Tokyo which is the Imperial Mausoleum and where Emperor Meiji is buried. Gokoku-ji Temple, established in 1681 by Tokugawa Tsunayoshi for his mother, is also famous as the central temple that oversees the practice of Japanese tea ceremony in all the country's temples.

Great Buddha - Kotoku-in Temple

The Great Buddha of Kamakura is housed within the Kotokuin Temple. The Great Buddha is 13.3 metres high and weighs 93 tons.

Gyokurin-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto.

Gyokuryu-in Temple

Gyokuryu-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Gyokuryu-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Hanto-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Hanto-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Hase Temple

Hase Temple is one of the great Buddhist temples in Kamakura. Hase Temple houses a massive wooden statue of Kannon.

Hashidera Hojoin Temple is a Buddhist temple, that was built to guard Uji Bridge (Uji Kyoto Prefecture) and is close to the bridge. Hashidera Hojoin Temple contains the stone monument commemorating the construction of Uji Bridge. This monument is believed to be the oldest stone monument in Japan.

Higashi Honganji Temple is one of two Buddhist temples a two hundred metres apart in Kyoto, which were until recently the one temple. Higashi Honganji Temple is now officially called Shinshu Honbyo, but is known by most people as Higashi Honganji Temple. Higashi Honganji Temple features a large hall which is a designated Important Cultural Properties. The two sites which were originally Honganji Temple form one site which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing.

Higashi-Hongan-ji Temple, officially known as Jodoshin sect Higashi-honganji-ha Higashi-Honganji Temple, is a Buddhist temple of the Jodo Shinshu sect, in Asakusa District, Taito Ward central Tokyo. Higashi-Hongan-ji Temple was originally built in Kanda, Tokyo by Kyonyo, the 12th Priest of Higashi-Honganji, in 1651 and it was known as the Edo Gobo Kozuiji Temple. After a fire in 1657 Higashi-Hongan-ji Temple was moved to its current site in Asakusa and was called Asakusa Honganji Temple. Then in 1965, Higashi-Hongan-ji Temple changed its name again to Tokyo Higashi-Honganji Temple. After the conflict called 'Ohigashi Sodo', it went independent from Otani sect in 1981.

Hogonji Temple

Hogonji Temple is a Buddhist temple on Chikubushima Island in Lake Biwa Shiga Prefecture, near Kyoto. Hogonji Temple features the National Tresure, a Karamon Gate which was for Shogun Toyotomi Hideyoshi's mausoleum and was transferred from Kyoto.

Hokkiji Temple

Hokkiji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Okamoto, Nara Prefecture. Hokkiji Temple features the oldest three story pagoda in Japan and is one of the Seven Great Temples of Nara. Hokkiji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Buddhist Monuments in the Horyu-ji Area" listing.

Hokongo-in Temple

Hokongo-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which was established in Hanazono, Kyoto in 1130. The current buildings were rebuilt in 1617. Hokongo-in Temple features a waterfall within its grounds, called Seijo-no-taki, which is the oldest artificial waterfall in Japan and designated as a Special Place of Scenic Beauty. Hokongo-in is famous for its lotus flowers and possesses four statues which are designated as Important Cultural Properties.

Hokyo-in Temple

Hokyo-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, in the Saga District of Kyoto, which is famous for its bright red and orange Autumn leaves. Hokyo-in Temple was constructed for Emperor Shirakawa during the Heian Period and was originally named Zennyu-ji Zennyu-ji. The current buildings were reconstructed after the Meiji Period.

Honenin Temple

Honenin Temple is one of the Buddhist temples along Kyoto's Philosopher's Walk. Honenin Temple is a beautiful secluded Japanese Temple, which is famous for its thatched gate and paintings on the sliding screens in the head priest's quarters are attributed to the Kano school of painters. Honenin Temple also features a Japanese pond garden and sculpted sand formations can be seen near the temple gate. The graveyard holds memorial stones for a number of authors such as Tanizaki Junichiro and other well-known people. Honenin Temple was founded in 1681 by the 38th abbot of Chion-in Temple on the site of a temple where Honen (1133-1212: founder of the Jodo sect) and his disciples trained. Honenin Temple was established to honour Honen.

Honganji Temple

Honganji Temple is actually two Buddhist temples two hundred metres apart in Kyoto, which were until recently the one temple. Both feature large halls which are designated Important Cultural Properties. The Nishi Honganji Temple features a Japanese garden which is designated as Special Place of Scenic Beauty. Honganji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing.

Hongen-in Temple

Hongen-in Temple is a Buddhist temple and sub temple of Nanshuji Temple in Sakai Osaka Prefecture. Hongen-in Temple was established in 1687 by Mitsugen Soyo, the 228th chief priest of Daitokuji Temple Kyoto.

Horin-ji Temple

Horin-ji Temple, also known as Miidara Temple, is a Buddhist temple in Nara only 1km from Hokkiji Temple. Horin-ji Temple was established in the 7th century, however none of the buildings date back to this period. The three story pagoda was reconstructed in 1975. Horin-ji Temple holds six Buddhist statues which are designated Important Cultural Assets.

Horin-ji Temple

Horin-ji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Shingon sect, which was established in 713AD. Enshrined in the hondo of Horin-ji Temple is a sculpture of Kokuzo Bosatsu, which has not been displayed for over 100 years. The tahoto (like a two story pagoda) of Horin-ji Temple is easily seen from the other side of the Oi River (on the Northern bank), where it runs through the Arashiyama District of Kyoto.

Horyuji Temple

Horyuji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Ikaruga, Nara Prefecture. Horyuji Temple's pagoda is considered to be one of the world's oldest surviving wooden building which started construction in 594. Horyuji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Buddhist Monuments in the Horyu-ji Area" listing.

Hoshunin Temple

Hoshunin Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto. Hoshunin Temple was built in 1608 by Hoshunin, the wife of Maeda Toshiie of Kaga, but were later destroyed by fire. The current main buildings were built in the early Meiji Period. The two story main hall, Donkokaku, hides a landscape Japanese garden complete with a pond and bridge suggests a style like Kinkakuji - Golden Pavilion.

Hozenji Temple

Hozenji Temple is a very small is a Buddhist temple, that was established in 1637. Hozenji Temple is in busy Dotonbori, a popular tourist destination in Namba Osaka, which is famous for its restaurants.

Ikegami Honmon-ji Temple is a Buddhist Temple which was established in 1282, by the famous Buddhist monk Nichiren. Ikegami Honmon-ji Temple features a five story pagoda, which was built in 1608 and is a designated Important Cultural Property, the Kyozo built in 1784 and the hoto, where Nichiren was cremated, built in 1781. All the other buildings have been built or rebuilt since 1945, when all the other buildings were destroyed by fire bombing. Between October 11 - 13th Ikegami Honmon-ji Temple holds the O-Eshiki festival. Ikegami Honmon-ji Temple is in Ota Ward of Tokyo.

Ishite-ji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Shingon sect, in Matsuyama Ehime Prefecture. Ishite-ji Temple is temple 51 of the Shikoku 88 Temple Pilgrimage. Ishite-ji Temple was established in 728AD and the oldest structure is the Niomon Gate or Deva Gate, which was completed in 1318 and is a designated National Treasure. The Ishite-ji Temple three story pagoda and gorinto (five ring tower) are Important Cultural Properties.

Jakkoin Temple is a famous scenic Buddhist temple north east of Kyoto. Jakkoin Temple enshrines a 2.5m wooden statue of Jizo-Bosatsu which is an Important Cultural Property. Jakkoin Temple features a Japanese garden on three sides. Much of Jakkoin Temple and its garden were destroyed in a fire in 2000. A replacement temple building was completed in 2005 and much of the garden has been restored.

Jigenji Temple, also known as Nozaki Kannon, is one of the most famous Buddhist temple in Japanese history with reference made to in many novels, songs and plays. Gyoki (668-749), the high priest at that time, made a wooden sculpture of the Goddess of Mercy and enshrined it. This is the origin of the temple. Jigenji Temple is in Eastern Osaka.

Jindaiji Temple is Buddhist temple within Jindai Botanical Garden in Chofu Tokyo. Jindaiji Temple was established in 733AD making it the second oldest temple in Tokyo, after Sensoji Temple. The temple bell and a statue of Buddha, which date back to the Hakuho period, are designated Cultral Assests of National Importance.

Jisonin Temple is a Buddhist temple in Ito District of Wakayama Prefecture. Jisonin Temple is at the beginning of the pilgrimage route to Koyasan. Jisonin Temple complex is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Sacred Sites and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range" listing.

Jiun-in Temple

Jiun-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Jiun-in Temple features a several dry landscape style Japanese gardens. Unfortunately Jiun-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Jizo Zen-in Temple, also known as the Jizo Zen Institute, is a Buddhist temple of the Soto sect, in Ida Kyoto. Jizo Zen-in Temple is a small temple that is famous for its cherry blossom, in particular its weeping cherry tree, that is said to have been planted in the Edo Period.

Jizo-in Temple

Jizo-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is also known as Take-no-tera (temple of bamboo), not because it is constructed of bamboo, but because it is in a bamboo forest. This bamboo forest creates a mystical atmosphere for your walk along the narrow path towards the temple gate. The temple grounds feature a zen style moss garden. Jizo-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is part of the Rinzai sect of Buddhism. The current temple buildings mostly date back to Edo period, as the original buildings were destroyed in the fires of the Onin war (1467-77). The temple was established by Hosokawa Yoriyuki in 1367. Jizo-in Temple is in the Arashiyama mountains, close to the World Heritage Listed Saihoji Temple.

Jochiji Temple is a Buddhist temple, formally known as Kinpozan Jochiji, that belongs to the Engakuji school of the Rinzai sect of Buddhism. Jochiji Temple is ranked fourth in the Five Mountain system for Kamakura's temples. While Jochiji Temple was established in 1283 little remains of the old buildings which numbered 11 at the peak of its power. Today all the buildings are recent constructions.

Jojakkoji Temple

Jojakkoji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Ukyo Ward of Kyoto. Jojakkoji Temple is famous for its bright red and orange maple leaves in Autumn. Jojakkoji Temple features a pagoda, which is a designated Important Cultural Property, that was completed in the 17th century, but in the 16th century Momoyama style.

Joju-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is famous for its Japanese gardens. The garden in Joju-in Temple is a borrowed scenery style and features a pond with two islands. Joju-in Temple is a sub temple of the World Heritage Site Kiyomizu-dera Temple.

Jokoji Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is in Eastern Osaka, was established in 745, it is the birth place of 'Kawachi-ondo', the most famous bon odori (a traditional Japanese dance) song.

Jorinji Temple

Jorinji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Sakyo Kyoto. Jorinji Temple was originally established by a monk called Rodo around 600 meter south of current location in 1573. Jorinji Temple was then moved to its current location when it was destroyed by a fire in 1671. The Jizo (guardian deity of stone statue) in this temple is believed to exist before Jorinji Temple was established, and have been popular among the local people.

Joruri-ji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Kyoto, that was established in 1047 and is famous for its Jodo-shiki (pure land style) Japanese garden. This garden, which features a pond in front of the main building, is designated as a Special Place of Scenic Beauty. The Main Hall, Three-story Pagoda, nine wooden Amitabha Tathagata statues and four heavenly kings are designated as National Treasures and many more statues and wall paintings are designated as Important Cultural Properties.

Joshoji Temple

Joshoji Temple, also known as Danrinnotera or Yoshinonotera, is famous for its front gate which is a distinctive vermillion colour and was donated to the temple by the famous courtesan Yoshino Taiyu. On the 2nd Sunday of April each year, a memorial service featuring beautiful flowers is held for Yoshino Taiyu. Joshoji Temple is also famous for its stunning red and orange leaves in Autumn which are spread throughout the garden surrounding the temple. Joshoji Temple is a Buddhist temple from the Nichiren sect, in north western Kyoto. Joshoji Temple was established in 1616.

Jufukuji Temple, formally known as Kikokuzan Kongo Jufuku Zenji, is the oldest Zen Buddhist temple in Kamakura's. Jufukuji Temple belongs to the Kenchoji branch of the Rinzai sect of Buddhism, and is ranked third in the Five Mountain system for Kamakura's temples. Jufukuji Temple was founded in 1200, by Hojo Masako, wife of the founder of the Kamabura Shogunate, Minamoto no Yoritomo, to enshrine Yoritomo. Today the only remaining building, the Main Hall, dates back to the 1750's, and is closed to the public.

Behind Jufukuji Temple's Main Hall is a large graveyard set into caves called yagura, where all the chief priests are buried.

Juko-in Temple

Juko-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto.

Jusei-in Temple

Jusei-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Jusei-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Kaie-ji Temple

Kaie-ji Temple is a Buddhist temple, which was established in 1332 by Kenpo Shidon on the site where Aguchi Shrine currently stands. Kaie-ji Temple was relocated to its current site after its cathedral was burnt down during the Summer Campaign of the Siege of Osaka in 1615. The Main Hall, Priestís Quarters and Inside Corridor are designated as National Important Cultural Properties particularly for the carvings and the shape of the Arched Beam which show typical early 17th centuryís characteristics. Kaie-ji Temple is part of the Tofukuji Temple group of temples.

Kaifuku-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Kaifuku-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Kaizando Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Kaizando Temple is not normally open to the public.

Kaneiji Temple

Kaneiji Temple, more formally known as Toeizan Kan'ei-ji Endon'in, is a Buddhist temple from the Tendai sect which is in what today is Ueno Park. however Ueno Park was actually formed from the grounds that belonged to Kaneiji Temple. Kaneiji Temple was established in 1625 by Tenkai. At its height of power Kaneiji Temple covered a large area and consisted of over 30 buildings including Rinnoji Temple. Many temple structures were destroyed in the great Mereiki fire of 1657. Some building were rebuilt only to be destroyed in World War II. Kaneiji Temple includes one Important Cultural Property, the Front Gate of Hondo, which was a grand and magnificent structure. The Front Gate of Hondo escaped the fire of May 1868, which destroyed all the other temple buildings. The fire was caused by the war of Shogitai. The Front Gate of Hondo had been used as the main entrance for the Tokyo National Museum since the museum was opened in 1878. When the museum was reconstruction, after the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923, the gate was moved to its present location.

Kanjizaio-in Temple is the site of a Buddhist temple in Hiraizumi Iwate Prefecture. Kanjizaio-in Temple was directly across the Frontier Way from the Enryuji and Kashoji temples (now within the Motsuji Temple complex). Kanjizaio-in Temple also included a Jodo (pure land) Japanese Garden. Kanjizaio-in Temple was destroyed by fire in 1226. Kanjizaio-in Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments and Sites of Hiraizumi" listing.

Katsuoji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Mino city north of Osaka. Supreme rulers in various periods in history had worshipped in Katsuoji Temple to pray for fortune in war and it is still known as a "temple of good luck at games".

Kegonji Temple

Kegonji Temple, also referred to as Suzumushi-dera Temple (the "cricket" temple) due to the large number of crickets that can be heard around the temple. Kegonji Temple features a moss covered Japanese garden and views of Kyoto city. Kegonji Temple is very popular when the monks are providing entertaining talks. People que up in the temple grounds waiting to hear the next talk. Kegonji Temple is Buddhist temple from the Rinzai sect, however it was established by the Kegon sect in 1723 .

Keishun-in Temple

Keishun-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Keishun-in Temple features several Japanese gardens and a tea house. Keishun-in Temple is one of the few Myoshinji Sub Temples which is normally open to the public.

Kenchoji Temple

Kenchoji Temple ranks first among Kamakura's so-called Five Great Zen Temples. Kenchoji Temple is the oldest Zen training monastery in Japan.

Kenninji Temple

Kenninji Temple is the oldest Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto and is the headquarters of the Kenninji sub-sect of the Rinzai sect of Buddhism. Kenninji Temple features the panel painting, 'Fu-jin Rai-jin zu' (Wind and Thunder Gods). Kenninji Temple is in the historic Gion District of Kyoto.

Kimii-dera Temple is a Buddhist temple in Wakayama that is famous for its early flowering cherry blossom and is considered one of Japan's Top 100 Cherry Blossom Spots. Kimii-dera Temple also features a climb of 231 steps from its tower gate up to the temple. This raised vantage point then provides panoramic views of Wakanoura Bay. Kimii-dera Temple was established in 770AD by Chinese monk and holy priest, Iko. Kimii-dera Temple's close proximity to Wakayama Castle ment that it was used by successive lords over the years. The main hall, constructed around 1755, contains a two story pagoda which was donated by the 10th Lord Harutomi.

Kimpusenji Temple is a Buddhist temple, and is the head temple for the Shugendo Buddhist sect in the Yoshino District of Nara Prefecture. Kimpusenji Temple is believed to have been established around second half of the 7th century by En no Ozunu who also founded the Shugendo sect. Kimpusenji Temple is at a junction of several of pilgramage routes. The Zaodo building within the temple complex is the second largest wooden structure in Japan. Kimpusenji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Sacred Sites and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range" listing.

Kingyu-in Temple

Kingyu-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Kingyu-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Kinkakuji Temple - Golden Pavilion

Golden Pavilion (Kinkaku) is the most famous Buddhist temple in Kyoto and probably Japan. Golden Pavilion (Kinkaku) is literally covered in gold leaf and is surround by beautiful Japanese gardens. Golden Pavilion (Kinkaku) is designated as a Special Place of Scenic Beauty and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing.

Kinzan Kozanji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Rinzai sect which is in Shimonoseki in Yamaguchi Prefecture. The Butsuden of Kinzan Kozanji Temple was completed in 1320 and is a designated National Treasure, features elements of Japanese and Chinese architecture in its design. The Butsuden's architectural style is known as Zenshuyo (Zen style) and it is oldest remaining example in Japan. The other buildings in the Kinzan Kozanji Temple complex are more recent, with the Sanmon dating to 1773 and the Kyozo dating to 1799. Kinzan Kozanji Temple is the 19th temple on the Chugoku 33 Kannon Pilgrimage.

Kissho-ji Temple (also spelt Kichijo-ji) is a Buddhist temple of Sendan-Rin sect in Bunkyo Tokyo. Kissho-ji Temple was established in 1458, with the "Sendan-Rin" School for Buddhist monks being established in the grounds of the temple in 1592. In 1905 the school was renamed, Soto-shu University, which was again renamed in 1925 Komazawa University.

Kiyomizu Kannon-do Temple

Kiyomizu Kannon-do Temple is a Buddhist temple in Ueno Park Tokyo. Kiyomizu Kannon-do Temple was established by Tenkai Sojo, who based the design on the famous Kiyomizu-dera Temple in Kyoto. Kiyomizu Kannon-do Temple which was completed in 1631 has survived the civil wars and the fire bombing of World War II to be one of the oldest temples in Tokyo.

Kiyomizu-dera Temple

Kiyomizu-dera Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is notable for its vast veranda, that offers impressive views of the Kyoto. Kiyomizu-dera Temple is one of the best known sights of Kyoto, being particularly popular in cherry blossom season when the main hall is surrounded by a carpet of blossom. Kiyomizu-dera Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing.

Ko-sho-in Temple

Ko-sho-in Temple is a Buddhist temple that was established in 1356 by Princess Shinshinaishino. After several fires, the current main building of Ko-sho-in Temple was refurbished in 1968. Ko-sho-in Temple is in Higashiyama Ward Kyoto.

Kodaiji Temple is a Buddhist temple from the Rinzai sect in Kyoto. Kodaiji Temple, formally known as Jubuzan Kodaiji, is the largest of the sub temples of Kenninji Temple. Kodaiji Temple was established in 1606 by the widow of Toyotomi Hideyoshi as a place to pray for late husband. Kodaiji Temple contains several items that are designated Important Cultural Assets including the Main Gate and Spirit Hall.

Koetsuji Temple

Koetsuji Temple, formally known as Taikyo-san, is a Buddhist temple of the Nichiren sect in northern Kyoto. The site of Koetsuji Temple was developed in 1615 when the artist Honami Koetsu received this land from Tokugawa Ieyasu. Koetsuji Temple was originally a mortuary for the Honami family, but was converted to a temple after the death of Koetsu. Koetsuji Temple is famous for bamboo fences, but also features a tea garden with three tea houses.

Kofukuji Temple

Kofukuji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Nara. Kofukuji Temple is a large temple complex featuring two pagodas plus many National Tresures and Important Cultural Properties. Kofukuji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara" listing.

Kofukuji Temple

Kofukuji Temple - Tomeizan Kofuku-ji is Japan's oldest and first Chinese temple of the Obaku sect. Kofukuji Temple reflects Nagasaki's history as a gateway for foreigners to Japan.

Kohou-an Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto.

Komyozenji Temple

Komyozenji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Dazaifu near Fukuoka, features two styles of Japanese garden; a stone zen garden plus a stone and moss garden. Komyozenji Temple was established in 1273 by a Buddhist priest called Tetsugyu Enshin.

Konchi In Temple

Konchi In Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Nanzenji Temple. Konchi In Temple is famous for its Tsurukame Garden which has an extensive dry landscape style Japanese garden which is designated as one of the Special Places of Scenic Beauty. Konchi In Temple is also noted for its Toshogu Shrine which has the only example of Gongen style architecture in Kyoto.

Kongobuji Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is the head temple of the Koyasan Shingon Buddhism sect and is on Mount Koya in Wakayama Prefecture. Kongobuji mean "Temple of diamond mountain". Kongobuji Temple features Japan's largest rock garden which covers 2340 square metres. Kongobuji Temple was first constructed in 1593 by Toyotomi Hideyoshi and then rebuilt in 1861. Kongobuji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Sacred Sites and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range" listing.

Korin-in Temple

Korin-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto. Korin-in Temple features several Important Cultural Assests and several Japanese gardens including dry landscape garden featuring a Corypha utan tree.

Koshoji Temple

Koshoji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Soto sect. Koshoji Temple is a training centre for the Eiheiji School, was moved to its current site in Uji from Fukakusa in Kyoto in 1648 after it had been destroyed after repeated wars. Koshoji Temple is most famous for its Kotozaka Slope, which leads from the main gate and is lined with cherry blossoms in the spring.

Koto-in Temple

Koto-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto. Koto-in Temple established in 1601 features two tea houses and is surrounded by moss covered gardens.

Koubai-in Temple

Koubai-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Koubai-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Kounji Temple

Kounji Temple is a Buddhist temple, which was originally established in Osaka in 1280 then transferred to Nanzenji, Kyoto in 1664. Kounji Temple features a beautiful Chisan Kaiyu-shiki garden (garden that features a path around a pond).

Kozanji Temple

Kozanji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Omuro sect, which is in the mountains of Umegahata in Kyoto Prefecture. Kozanji Temple features the oldest tea field in Japan and possesses many National Treasures including buildings, pictures and scrolls. Kozanji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing.

Kurama Temple

Kurama Temple is a Buddhist temple formerly from the Tendai sect, but since 1949 it has been part of the Kurama-Kokyo sect. Kurama Temple was founded in 770AD on Mt Kurama north of Kyoto, but all the original buildings were destroyed by fire with the Main Hall being last rebuilt in 1971. Kurama Temple is most famous for its part in the Kurama Fire Festival that takes place every year in October. Kurama Temple is a designated National Treasure.

Kyuanji Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is famous for its legacy of buildings from its long history and the beautiful garden where people can enjoy various flower and trees throughout the year. Especially, autumn is the most spectacular with its Momiji (Japanese maple). Momiji Matsuri is held in Kyuanji Temple on the 3rd of November every year. Kyuanji Temple is in Ikeda, Osaka.

Mangyoji Temple

Mangyoji Temple, in Hakata (Fukuoka), is a Buddhist temple from the Shin sect. Mangyoji Temple was established by Shoku in 1529. Mangyoji Temple features the tomb of the nun, Meigetsu, who in her youth used to be a well known prostitute in the town of Hakata.

Manpukuji Temple is a Buddhist temple from the Obaku sect of Zen Buddhism which is in Uji (Kyoto Prefecture). Manpukuji Temple was completed in 1668 with a distinctive Chinese architectural style which has made it famous throughout Japan and probably why many of the buildings are designated Important Cultural Properties.

Manshuin Temple is a Buddhist temple from the Tendai sect in north eastern Kyoto. Manshuin Temple, also known as Manshuin Monzeki, is famous for its dry landscape garden which includes 400 year old pine tree.

Mibudera Temple is a Buddhist temple, that is the head temple for Risshu sect of Buddhism and is in Kyoto. Mibudera Temple which was established in 991AD is famous for several things; its "Mibu kyogen" performance in April, its statue of Kondo Isami and its connection to the "shisen-gumi" (the samurai who protected Kyoto in the late Edo Period).

Mii-dera Temple is a Buddhist temple, that is the head temple for the Tendai Jimon Buddhist sect one of the four largest temple complexes in Japan. Mii-dera Temple is at the base of Mt Hiei in the city of Otsu in Shiga Prefecture (near Kyoto). Mii-dera Temple was established in 672AD, however the oldest building is the Kannon-do which was built in 1072. Mii-dera Temple is the fourteenth temple in the Pilgrimage of 33 Temples devoted to Kannon in the Kansai area.

Misenhondo Hall is the temple hall where Kobo Daishi performed Buddhist practice. It is said that Kobo Daishi founded the temple and performed the "Gumonji", a secret Buddhist practice for 100 days when he stopped over at Miyajima for looking for a sacred place on his way from Tang.

Mitsukuni-in Temple

Mitsukuni-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Mitsukuni-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Motsuji Temple is a Tendai Buddhist temple in Hiraizumi Iwate Prefecture. Motsuji Temple complex includes a Jodo (pure land) Japanese garden that contains the ruins of two much older temples, Enryuji and Kashoji which date back to the 12 century. Enryuji and Kashoji were both destroyed by fire in 1226. Motsuji Temple is designated as a Special Place of Scenic Beauty and a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments and Sites of Hiraizumi" listing.

Myoshinji Temple

Myoshinji Temple is large Buddhist temple complex, in Kyoto, which contains thirty eight sub temples, some of which are famous for their Japanese gardens. Myoshinji Temple features several building which are Important Cultural Properties.

Myotsuji Temple is a Buddhist temple from the Shingon Sect, in Obama Fukui Prefecture. The Hondo (main hall), from the Kamakura period, and the three story pagoda of Myotsuji Temple are disignated National Treasures. The Hondo was built in 1258 and the three story pagoda was built in 1270. There are also two other significant buildings, the Sanmon and the Shoro. Myotsuji Temple also features several statues from the Heian period which are designated Important Cultural Properties.

Nanshuji Temple

Nanshuji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Sakai Osaka Prefecture, was established in 1557 and is famous for Sen-no-Rikyu, the most famous tea master in Japanese history. Nanshuji Temple features beautiful Karesansui style Japanese garden. The San-mon (the main gate), and Kara-mon (the gate in Chinese style) are both designated Important Cultural Properties.

Nanzenji Temple

Nanzenji Temple (Kyoto) is a popular Japanese Temple complex with a distinctive two-story entrance gate (sanmon) and aqueduct. Nanzenji Temple is famous for its bright red and orange Autumn leaves. Nanzenji Temple is close to Kyoto's Philosopher's Walk.

Narihira-san Tosen-ji Temple, also known as Tosen-ji Temple, is a Buddhist temple near Mizumoto Park in Katsushika Ward of north eastern Tokyo. Narihira-san Tosen-ji Temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo" mentioned in the Case of the Bound Jizo of Ooka Tadasuke, a famous Edo Period judge.

Negoroji Temple is large complex of Buddhist temples from the Shingon sect which once had around 2,700 temples on the site. The Negoroji Temple complex was started in 1087 by En no Gyoja, but in 1585 many of the buildings were burnt down, fortunately the main pagoda and several other buildings were saved. Negoroji Temple, in Iwate Wakayama Prefecture, includes a highly regarded Japanese gardens.

Nehando Temple

Nehando Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Nehando Temple is not normally open to the public.

Nigatsudo Temple

Nigatsudo Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is part of a sub temple complex which is within the Todaiji Temple complex. Nigatsudo Temple is to the east of the Great Buddha Hall on the side of Mount Wakakusa in Nara Park where it provides a great view across the valley towards Nara city. While the temple dates back to 772AD, the current building dates back to 1669 after a fire destroyed the first temple building.

Ninnaji Temple

Ninnaji Temple is a Buddhist temple, that is the head temple of the Omuro School of the Shingon sect Buddhism, which was founded on the orders of Emperor Koko and completed in 888. Ninnaji Temple, in Kyoto, features a five storied pagoda and a treasure house which contains many National Treasures. Ninnaji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing.

Nishi Honganji Temple is one of two Buddhist temples two hundred metres apart in Kyoto, which were until recently the one temple. Nishi Honganji Temple features a large hall which are designated Important Cultural Properties. Nishi Honganji Temple also features a Japanese garden which is designated as a Special Place of Scenic Beauty. The two sites which were originally Honganji Temple form one site which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing.

Nishiarai Daishi is a Buddhist temple of the Buzan branch of the Shingon Sect, located in the Nishiarai District of Adachi Ward Tokyo. Nishiarai Daishi, formally know as Gochisan Henjoin Soji-ji Temple, it is said to be one of the Three Great Temples of Kanto. Many people visit Nishiarai Daishi during the New Year period.

Nison-in Temple

Nison-in Temple, officially known as Ogura-yama Nison-kyo-in Keidai-ji, is a Buddhist temple of the Tendai sect, in Ukyo Ward of Kyoto. Nison-in Temple is famous for its bright red and orange maple leaves in Autumn (early December). Nison-in Temple was established in 834AD, however all of the structures from this time were destroyed in the Onin War. Nison-in Temple does still feature a significant cemetery which includes the graves of emperors, members of elite class and father of Sanjonishi Sanetaka. Nison-in Temple houses two designated Important Cultural Properties, which are both statues of Buddha from the Heian Period, one depicts the founding Buddha and the other when he has reached enlightment.

Nose Myokensan Temple is a Buddhist temple from the Nichiren sect temple which attracts many visitors on a new year's. Nose Myokensan Temple is on top of the beautiful Mt Myoken in Nose Osaka, where there are many large beech trees including some with a circumference of 2 meters. It is a very scenic journey from Kawanishi-noseguchi to Myoken-guchi, which is the full line of on a Noseden line, which was originally developed just for the trip to this temple. After getting off at Myoken-guchi station, another scenic journey by cable car and lift is waiting for you. There are many beech trees on Mt Myoken including more than 100 trees with a circumference of 2 meters. Among them, the biggest one with 1.3 meter in diameter is designated as a natural treasure. It is also a great place for bird watching with more than 82 pieces found this area. Built in 1603, Nose Myokensan Temple is a Nichiren sect temple and attracts many visitors on a new year's. There is a popular hiking course and picnic place near the temple.

Nyoi-an Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto.

Nyoze-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Nyoze-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Nyushin-in Temple

Nyushin-in Temple is a Buddhist temple that is a sub temple of the nearby Chion-in Temple, which is in Higashiyama Ward Kyoto.

Obaiin Temple

Obaiin Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto. Obaiin Temple was established in 1562 under orders of Nobunaga Oda as a place to hold a memorial service for his father. In 1586 the main hall and Karamon gate were renovated. In 1589 the Kurimon gate and the front gate were renovated. The family quarters of Obaiin Temple are considered to be the oldest of all the remaining Zen Temples in Japan.

Ominesanji Temple is an important Buddhist temple for the Shugendo Buddhist sect. Ominesanji Temple is on the top of Mount Omine in the Yoshino District of Nara Prefecture. Ominesanji Temple was found around 600AD by En no Ozunu who also founded the Shugendo sect. Parts of Ominesanji Temple are considered sacred and only men can enter these. Ominesanji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Sacred Sites and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range" listing.

Otani Sobyo

Otani Sobyo is a Buddhist temple and mausoleum for Jodo Shinshu Otani Sect monks including Monk Shinran (1173-1262), the founder of Shin Buddhism. Otani Sobyo was established in 1272. During Obon (14th -16th Aug) each year, around 10,000 lanterns are lit at Otani Sobyo, which attracts many visitors. Otani Sobyo is in the Higashiyama Ward of Kyoto.

Raikou-ji Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto.

Reiun-in Temple

Reiun-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Reiun-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Rengeji Temple

Rengeji Temple is a Buddhist temple, that is famous for its garden which is best seen when the leaves start to change colour in Autumn. Rengeji Temple is in north eastern Kyoto.

Rinka-in Temple

Rinka-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Rinka-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Rinnoji Temple

Rinnoji Temple, also known as Rinno-ji Ryodaishi-do, is a Buddhist temple, which was a part of the cathedral of Kaneiji Temple and was called Kaizan-do or Jigen-do. In 1644 when Rinnoji Temple was constructed, what is now Ueno Park used to be the grounds of Kaneiji Temple. When Jigen Daishi (Tenkai), the founder of Kaneiji Temple, passed away, they enshrined him along with Jie Daishi (Ryogen), whom Jigen Daishi highly respected, at Rinnoji Temple. As Rinnoji Temple enshrines these two priests, it is also known as Ryodaishi-do (means two great teachers' temple). The main temple building was reconstructed in 1993 after several fires.

Rinnoji Temple

Rinnoji Temple is a complex of 15 Buddhist temple buildings, which are is famous for their gold-leafed statues of Amida and Kannon. Rinnoji Temple, in Nikko, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Shrines and Temples of Nikko" listing.

Rinshouin Temple

Rinshouin Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Rinshouin Temple is not normally open to the public.

Risshakuji Temple

Risshakuji Temple, in Yamagata, is one of the most amazing Buddhist temple in Japan. Generally known as Yamadera Temple (Mountain Temple), Risshakuji Temple was founded by Monk En-nin (Jikaku Daishi) in 860. The complex is built along a rocky mountain where visitors have to climb up 1015 narrow steps among trees. Some of the buildings were built on a very dangerous cliff, where many monks had a training in the past.

Rozan-ji Temple

Rozan-ji Temple is a Buddhist temple, which features a large Zen Japanese garden. The garden in Rozan-ji Temple is unusual as it has large trees on many of islands of moss. Rozan-ji Temple was established in 938AD at the foot of Mt Funaoka, but was then relocated to its current location in Kyoto, opposite the Kyoto Imperial Palace Park in 1573. Rozan-ji Temple was destroyed by fire in 1788, during the conflagration of Temmei, with the current buildings being constructed shortly after. Rozan-ji Temple is a owned by the Imperial Household.

Ryoanji Temple

Ryoanji Temple is a Buddhist temple, that houses a Japanese gardens which is considered to be one of the most notable examples of the "dry-landscape" style. This garden, which is the quintessential form of Zen art, and perhaps the greatest masterpiece of Japanese culture, features fifteen rocks arranged on a white gravel within a space of 248 square meters. Ryoanji Temple is in Kyoto, is designated as a Special Place of Scenic Beauty and a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing.

Ryogen-in Temple

Ryogen-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto. Ryogen-in Temple is famous for its five Japanese garden in particular the stone and moss garden Isshidan, however it also lays claim to Japan's smallest stone garden. Ryogen-in Temple was established in 1502.

Ryosen-an Temple

Ryosen-an Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Ryosen-an Temple is not normally open to the public.

Ryoukou-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto.

Ryousen-an Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto.

Ryousho-ji Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto.

Ryuanji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Mino, which was established by the En-no-gyoja in 658AD after he was enlightened through his training under the Mino Waterfall.

Saidaiji Temple

Saidaiji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Shingon sect which is in Nara. Saidaiji Temple means Great Western Temple as it is to the west of its counterpart Todaiji Temple. Saidaiji Temple was established in 765AD.

Saihoji Temple

Saihoji Temple is Buddhist temple from the Rinzai Zen sect which is famous for its moss garden, which probably the best in Japan. Unfortunately access to Saihoji Temple, also known as Kokedera (Moss Temple) requires an application in advance. Saihoji Temple, in Kyoto, is designated as a Special Place of Scenic Beauty and a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing.

Sangen-in Temple

Sangen-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto. Sangen-in Temple was established in 1589 by Mitunari Ishida, Yukinaga Asano and Tadamasa Mori. The tea room of Sangen-in Temple, Koan, is a well known example of eight-windowed Oribe style. The tea room was constructed in the 17th century.

Sanjusangen-do Temple

Sanjusangendo Temple is a Buddhist temple from the Tendai sect, in the Higashiyama District of Kyoto. Sanjusangendo Temple is famous for the Thousand Armed Kannon it houses. Sanjusangendo Temple is a classic Japanese Temple.

Sanzenin Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Tendai sect, in northern Kyoto. Sanzenin Temple is famous for its beautiful gardens that feature a moss garden, Autumn leaves and cherry blossom in Spring. Sanzenin Temple, also known as Kajii Monzeki, is one of the five Tendai Monzeki temples which in the past always had a chief priest who was a member of the Imperial family. Sanzenin Temple was first established in 985 and also features the distinctive thatched Ojo-Gokuraku-in which enshrines the Amida trinity statues.

Seigantoji Temple is a Tendai Buddhist temple in Higashimuro District Wakayama Prefecture. Seigantoji Temple was built near Nachi Falls which was an ancient site of worship. Seigantoji Temple was built around the fourth century. Seigantoji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Sacred Sites and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range" listing.

Seikenji Temple

Seikenji Temple is a Buddhist temple that was established by Monk Jindo in Amagasaki-shi, Hyogo Prefecture between 1342 and 1345. Seikenji Temple was reconstructed and relocated in 1932 to its current site in Sakyo Ward Kyoto. Seikenji Temple features some pretty red and orange Autumn leaves in late November.

Seiryo-ji Temple

Seiryo-ji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Pure Land sect, which frequently referred to as Sagashakado (Hall of Shakyamuni Tathagata in Saga). The current site of Seiryo-ji Temple was originally the mountain villa, Seikakan, of Minamoto-no-Toru, who was the basis for the "Hikaru Genji" character in the famous "Tale of Genji". After the death of Minamoto-no-Toru, the villa was converted to a temple known as Sikaji Temple, which was later named Seiryo-ji Temple. Seiryo-ji Temple features a very large and impressive gate, a two story pagoda, Japanese garden and trees which feature some stunning red and orange Autumn leaves. The main object of enshrinement in the temple is a life sized image of Shakyamuni Tathagata, which was installed in 945AD. Seiryo-ji Temple is sited in Saga District Kyoto, close to several other temples which also very popular for their displays of Autumn leaves.

Sengakuji Temple

Sengakuji Temple is famous as the location of the graves of Asano Takumi no Kami Naganori and the 47 Ronin, who were involved in the Revenge of the Forty-seven Ronin, also known as the Revenge of the Forty-seven Samurai or Ako vendetta. Sengakuji Temple was originally constructed under the orders of Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1612 close to Edo Castle. However Sengakuji Temple was later destroyed by fire and then rebuilt on its present day site. On the 14th of December each year, the aniversary of the Revenge of the Forty-seven Ronin, Sengakuji Temple holds a festival which includes a ceremony in the graveyard. Sengakuji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Soto Zen sect, which is in Takanawa District of Minato Tokyo.

Senko-ji Temple

Senko-ji Temple is a Buddhist temple in the Arashiyama District of Kyoto. Senko-ji Temple sits half way up the mountain side and be seen from the look out point in Arashiyama Park and one of the look out points in Okochi Sanso.

Sensoji Temple

Sensoji Temple is an ancient Buddhist temple also known as Asakusa Temple. Sensoji Temple is Tokyo's oldest, and one of its most significant, temples. Sensoji Temple is in Asakusa District of Taito Ward Tokyo.

Shibamata Taikyakuten, formally known as Kyoeizan Daikyoji Temple, is a Buddhist temple of the Nichiren sect, which is in Shibamata District Katsushika Ward of Tokyo. Shibamata Taikyakuten, established in 1629, is particularly popular on New Years day and other festival days. Shibamata Taikyakuten was used in the famous Japanese film Otoko wa Tsurai yo (It's tough being a man). In 1996 the Ministry of the Environment designated Shibamata Taikyakuten and its ferry boat as one of the 100 Soundscapes of Japan.

Shinju-an Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto.

Shinnyo-do Temple

Shinnyo-do Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Tendai sect in Kyoto. Shinnyo-do Temple is famous for its bright red and orange leaves in Autumn. Shinnyo-do Temple was established in 984AD by Kaisan Shonin.

Shisendo Temple

Shisendo Temple is a Buddhist temple from the Zen Soto sect, which is to the north east of Kyoto. Shisendo Temple is famous for its Japanese garden which features azalea bushes, gravel areas and ponds. This tranquil temple was established in 1641 by the poet Ishikawa Jozan, who actually designed the garden.

Shitennoji Temple

Shitennoji Temple was established in 593AD, making it the first Buddhist temple in Japan. Shitennoji Temple is in Tennoji Ward Osaka.

Shodenji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Rinzai sect, in northern Kyoto close to Kinkakuji - Golden Pavilion. Shodenji Temple is famous for its Japanese rock or dry landscape garden which features Mt Hiei as a borrow scenery.

Shofukuji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Rinzai Zen sect which is in Higashimurayama Tokyo. The Jizo Hall of Shofukuji Temple dates from 1407, which is considered to be the oldest intact building in Tokyo Prefecture and a National Treasure of Japan. The Jizo Hall is one of the few remaining examples of Kamakura architecture. Shofukuji Temple was established in 1270 and the original Jizo Hall was completed in 1278.

Shoju-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto.

Shorenin Temple

Shorenin Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Tendai sect in Kyoto. Shorenin Temple is one of five Monzeki temples where in the past, the head priest at these temples was always belonged to the Imperial family. Shorenin Temple features two observatories that provide excellent views of the city of Kyoto. Shorenin Temple features a beautiful Japanese garden that emphasises the beauty of the four seasons.

Shoushukuin Temple

Shoushukuin Temple is a Buddhist temple from the same sect as they nearby Chion-in Temple. Shoushukuin Temple also contains the Matsukaze Tenmangu Shrine. When Chion-in Temple was destroyed by a fire in 1633, Ouyoreigan, the monk in charge, asked Shogun Tokugawa Iemitsu for funding for its reconstruction, and it was granted. Ouyoreigan prayed for Tenjin (Japanese God) for its success. As it was successfully reconstructed, Ouyoreigan enshrined Tenjin here. This is how Matsukaze Tenmangu Shrine came to be established within Shoushukuin Temple. Shoushukuin Temple is in Higashiyama Ward Kyoto.

Shoutaku-in Temple

Shoutaku-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Shoutaku-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Shunko-in Temple

Shunko-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Shunko-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Sogenji Temple

Sogenji Temple was a Buddhist temple and mausoleum for the royalty of the Ryukyu Kingdom. Most of Sogenji Temple was destroyed during the Battle of Okinawa (1945), however the substaintial stone gates remain including the stone tablet that informs all visitors to dismount. Even the kings of the Ryukyu Kingdom had to dismount prior to passing through the stone gates out of respect for the previous kings. The original stone walls of Sogenji Temple also remain, along with the foundations of the temple. Sogenji Temple was established in around 1477.

Soken-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto. Soken-in Temple was established in 1582 by Toyotomi Hideyoshi as a mortuary temple of Oda Nobunaga. In the early part of the Meiji Period the Soken-in Temple was demolished and its treasures moved to other temples. In 1926 Soken-in Temple was re-established and in 1961 a wooden statue of Oda Nobunaga (designated Important Cultural Property) was returned.

Sonohyan-utaki

Sonohyan-utaki is an area within Shuri Castle which includes the religiously significant Sonohyan-utaki stone gates, built in 1519, and a grove of trees and plants leading to the gates. The gates were only opened for the king, who would pray at there prior to going on a journey. Sonohyan-utaki is a World Heritage Site.

Sumadera Temple

Sumadera Temple is a Buddhist temple in Kobe was originally built in 886 by the order of Emperor Koko. Sumadera Temple features a display from the Battle of Ichi-no-Tani (1184).

Taieizan Ryusenji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Tendai Sect which is famous for its image of Achala with black eyes. Taieizan Ryusenji Temple is also referred to as Meguro Fudoson as it is in the Meguro Ward Tokyo. After the main hall burnt down in 1615, it was rebuilt by Tokugawa Shogunate in 1624.

Taikoji Temple is a Buddhist temple on Mt Satsuki in Ikeda Osaka. Taikoji Temple was built in 1395 by the order of Mitsumasa Ikeda, the lord of Ikeda Castle at the time. Since then, it has a strong relationship with Ikeda Castle and has been a family temple for Ikeda family. All ancestral of Ikeda Castle lords' graves are kept in this temple and the board where Sadamasa Ikeda, the last lord of Ikeda Castle, committed seppuku is displayed.

Taizo-in Temple

Taizo-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Taizo-in Temple is famous for its three Japanese gardens, which include two dry landscape and another large garden featuring a waterfall and pond. Taizo-in Temple is one of the few Myoshinji Sub Temples which is normally open to the public.

Tamagawa Daishi Temple, officially known as Gyokushin Mitsuin Temple, is a Buddhist temple of the Shingon sect which was built in 1925. Tamagawa Daishi Temple is in the Seta District of Setagaya Ward Tokyo. Tamagawa Daishi Temple is famous for its 300 candlelit statues of Kannon, that are placed along a dark twisting corridor which represents the intestines of Vairocana Buddha.

Tenju-in Temple

Tenju-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Tenju-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Tenjuan Temple

Tenjuan Temple is a Buddhist temple, that is a sub temple of Nanzenji Temple and within the massive Nanzenji Temple precinct in Kyoto. Tenjuan Temple is famous for its two beautiful Japanese gardens including a dry garden and a pond within a strolling garden.

Tenkei-in Temple

Tenkei-in Temple, also known as Ryukozan Tenkei-in Temple, but originally called Kaigen-an, is a Buddhist temple, which is related to Nanshuji Temple and Daitokuji Temple Kyoto. Tenkei-in Temple is in Sakai Osaka Prefecture, almost next to Nanshuji Temple.

Tenkyu-in Temple

Tenkyu-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Tenkyu-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Tenryuji Temple

Tenryuji Temple is the head temple of the Tenryu sect of Rinzai Zen Buddhism and the most important Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto. Tenryuji Temple possesses many Important Cultural Properties and features an extensive garden which is particularly beautiful in cherry blossom season and is designated as a Special Place of Scenic Beauty. Tenryuji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing.

Tensho-in Temple

Tensho-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Tensho-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Todaiji Temple

Todaiji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Nara, which is famous for being the world's largest wooden building, which houses Japan's largest statue of Buddha. Todaiji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara" listing.

Tofukuji Temple

Tofukuji Temple is a Buddhist temple which is one of the Kyoto Gozan (Five Great Zen Temples of Kyoto). Tofukuji Temple is a large temple complex with 24 sub temples remaining from an original 53. Tofukuji Temple is famous for its main gate (sanmon) which is the oldest in Japan and a designate National Treasure. The sanmon is two stories high and five bays wide with three central doors. Tofukuji Temple also famous for its four zen style Japanese gardens, which are together known as the Hasso Garden. Of particular note is the moss and stone garden on the north side. Tofukuji Temple was established in 1236 on its current site in the Higashiyama region of Kyoto.

MINOR SUB TEMPLES
These sub temples are not normally open to the public.
Daiki-in
Ganjo-ji
Ikka-in
Jo-ko-in
Kaizo-in
Keisho-in
Ko-myo-in
Manjuji
Nan-mei-in
Reigen-in
Reiun-in
Rikkyoku-an
Ryo-gin-an
Ryo-min-an
Sho-gaku-an
Sho-gon-in
Sho-rinji
Sokushu-in
Taiko-an
Tentoku-in
To-ko-ji
Yo-mei-in
Zen-ne-in

Toji Temple

Toji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Shingon sect, near central Kyoto on a large site with extensive gardens, it is an oasis of calm in a busy area. Toji Temple is famous for its five story pagoda which is the tallest wooden tower in Japan. Toji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto (Kyoto, Uji and Otsu Cities)" listing.

Tokai-an Temple

Tokai-an Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Tokai-an Temple is not normally open to the public.

Tokeiji Temple, formally known as Shokozan Tokeiji, is a Buddhist temple, that is the only surviving nunnery in Kamakura of the five that originally existed, that served as a refuge for women who had been mistreated by their husbands. Tokeiji Temple is sometimes also referred to as the "Divorce Temple".

Tokeiji Temple was completed in 1285 to enshrine Hojo Tokimune, but his wife, Kakusan-ni, also opened the temple to women as a nunnery. It was not until 1902 that men were allowed to enter the temple.

Tokokuji Temple

Tokokuji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Tennoji Osaka, next to, but outside Keitakuen Garden.

Tokuzen-ji Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto.

Toshodaiji Temple

Toshodaiji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Nara, that is the head temple in Japan of the Ritsu-shi sect of Buddhism. Toshodaiji Temple has many buildings dating back to 759 that are National Treasures. Toshodaiji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara" listing.

Tourin-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Tourin-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Tsugen-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Tsugen-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Tsukiji Honganji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Jodo Shinshu sect in the Tsukiji District of Chuo Ward Tokyo. The current Tsukiji Honganji Temple building was completed in 1934 and designed by Chuuta Ito of the University of Tokyo and features an architecture which is influenced by the design of temples from south Asia. Tsukiji Honganji Temple holds artifacts of Prince Shotoku, Shinran Shonin, and Kyonyo Shonin, which makes the temple a popular destination for pilgrimes.

Unrin-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is across the road from the main compound in Kyoto.

Unsho-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unsho-in Temple is one of the few Myoshinji Sub Temples which is normally open to the public.

Yakushiji Temple

Yakushiji Temple is one of the most famous imperial and ancient Buddhist temples in Japan, in Nara. Yakushiji Temple is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and forms part of the "Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara" listing.

Yata-dara Temple

Yata-dara Temple is a Buddhist temple, also know as Yatasan- Kongosenji Temple is famous for its hillside gardens full of hydrangeas. Yata-dara Temple is in Nara.

Yoshimine-dera Temple is a Buddhist temple in western Kyoto, is the 20th temple on the Saigoku Kannon pilgrimage. Yoshimine-dera Temple features herbal baths said to help neuralgia suffers, given the temple the common name of "Neuralgia Temple". While Yoshimine-dera Temple does feature some cherry blossom, it is most famous for it Autumn leaves.

Yotoku-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto.

Yotoku-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Yotoku-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Yougen-in Temple

Yougen-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Yougen-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Yushima Temple, also known as Yushima Seido, is a Buddhist temple in the Yushima District of Bunkyo Ward Tokyo. Yushima Temple was constrcted in 1630, by the fifth-generation Tokugawa Shogun, Tsunayoshi, to enshrine Confucius. Yushima Temple used to be the Shoheizaka School of Edo Shogunate. Yushima Temple is very close to Ochanomizu Station.

Zakke-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is one of the thirty eight sub temples of Myoshinji Temple which is within the large Myoshinji Temple complex in north eastern Kyoto. Unfortunately Zakke-in Temple is not normally open to the public.

Zenkoji Temple is a famous 7th century Buddhist temple in Nagano City, however the temple pre-dates the city by hundreds of years. Originally the township, that became Nagano City, was focused around Zenkoji Temple. Zenkoji Temple is unusual as it belongs to both the Tendai and Jodo Shinshu schools of Buddhism. Zenkoji Temple enshrines images of Amida Buddha including Hibutsu, the Hidden Buddha Statue, which is named so as it only put on display every six or seven years. Zenkoji Temple is most famous for its involvement in the 16th century battles between Uesugi Kenshin and Takeda Shingen, where the temple acted as a base for Kenshin's forces.

Zojoji Temple

Zojoji Temple is a famous Buddhist temple, which is frequently seen in pictures with Tokyo Tower in the background, holds six of the fifteen Tokugawa shogun graves. Zojoji Temple, which enshrines an image of Amida Buddha, is the Great Main Temple of the Chinzei school of Jodo-shu Buddhism. The Sangedatsu Gate at Zojoji Temple was constructed in 1662 is recognised as an Important Cultural Property. Diabonsho (Big Bell) is a giant bell weighing 15 tons, with a diameter of 1.76 and height of 3.33 metres is famous for being one of the Big Three Bells of the Edo Period. Diabonsho is rung twice a day. Zojoji Temple was founded in 1393.

Zuigan-ji Temple

Zuiganji Temple is a Buddhist temple in Matsushima, is considered to be one of the greatest Zen temples in Tohoku area. Zuiganji Temple was completed in 828AD, by craftsmen from many countries.

Zuiho-in Temple

Zuiho-in Temple is a Buddhist temple, which is a sub temple of Daitokuji Temple and is within the same compound in Kyoto. Zuiho-in Temple, established in 1319, features several Japanese gardens including the beautiful "Garden of Solitary Sitting" which is a dry landscape garden.

Zuiryu-ji Temple is a Buddhist temple of the Sodo Sect in Takaoka Toyama Prefecture. Zuiryu-ji Temple was built by Toshitune to recognise Toshinaga Maeda, the founder of Takaoka. The gate, Buddhist sanctum and lecture hall of Zuiryu-ji Temple are all designated National Treasures. The Buddhist Sanctum features a lead plate roof which weighs 47 tons.

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