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    Atsuta Shrine (Atsuta Jingu) is thought to be the second most important shrine in Japan, second only to Ise Jingo (Ise Shrine). Atsuta Shrine is very popular, attracting over 9 million visitors annually. Atsuta Shrine was originally founded in 113AD, when the sacred sword Kusanagi-no-tsurugi, one of the Imperial symbols, was enshrined. Atsuta was chosen as the site for the shrine by Miyasuhime-no-Mikoto, wife of the then Prince Yamatotakeru-no-Mikoto, who had died leaving the sword._x000D_
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    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine - 0864

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine

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    Atsuta Shrine has been well supported by authorities and people over the years, to the point that it has a collection of over 4,000 relics including many National Treasures._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine - 0867

    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine

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    _x000D_
    During the Second World War most of the Atsuta Shrine buildings were destroy by fire. After the war the reconstruction was begun by the combined effort of all devout worshipers of the shrine all over the country. The main buildings were completed in 1955 and the remaining construction was completed in 2009._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine - 0846

    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_

    Why no pictures of the Haiden (Prayer Hall)?

    _x000D_
    There seems to be an inconsistent policy regarding the photographing of some of the buildings at Atsuta Shrine. When I visited, my guide specifically requested that I not take photographs of the Haiden (Pray Hall) and the Kaguraden. However pictures of these sacred buildings do appear on the internet.Atsuta Shrine (Atsuta Jingu) is thought to be the second most important shrine in Japan, second only to Ise Jingo (Ise Shrine). Atsuta Shrine is very popular, attracting over 9 million visitors annually. Atsuta Shrine was originally founded in 113AD, when the sacred sword Kusanagi-no-tsurugi, one of the Imperial symbols, was enshrined. Atsuta was chosen as the site for the shrine by Miyasuhime-no-Mikoto, wife of the then Prince Yamatotakeru-no-Mikoto, who had died leaving the sword._x000D_
    _x000D_

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine - 0864

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    Atsuta Shrine has been well supported by authorities and people over the years, to the point that it has a collection of over 4,000 relics including many National Treasures._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine - 0867

    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    During the Second World War most of the Atsuta Shrine buildings were destroy by fire. After the war the reconstruction was begun by the combined effort of all devout worshipers of the shrine all over the country. The main buildings were completed in 1955 and the remaining construction was completed in 2009._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine - 0846

    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_

    Why no pictures of the Haiden (Prayer Hall)?

    _x000D_
    There seems to be an inconsistent policy regarding the photographing of some of the buildings at Atsuta Shrine. When I visited, my guide specifically requested that I not take photographs of the Haiden (Pray Hall) and the Kaguraden. However pictures of these sacred buildings do appear on the internet.Atsuta Shrine (Atsuta Jingu) is thought to be the second most important shrine in Japan, second only to Ise Jingo (Ise Shrine). Atsuta Shrine is very popular, attracting over 9 million visitors annually. Atsuta Shrine was originally founded in 113AD, when the sacred sword Kusanagi-no-tsurugi, one of the Imperial symbols, was enshrined. Atsuta was chosen as the site for the shrine by Miyasuhime-no-Mikoto, wife of the then Prince Yamatotakeru-no-Mikoto, who had died leaving the sword._x000D_
    _x000D_

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine - 0864

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    Atsuta Shrine has been well supported by authorities and people over the years, to the point that it has a collection of over 4,000 relics including many National Treasures._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine - 0867

    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    During the Second World War most of the Atsuta Shrine buildings were destroy by fire. After the war the reconstruction was begun by the combined effort of all devout worshipers of the shrine all over the country. The main buildings were completed in 1955 and the remaining construction was completed in 2009._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine - 0846

    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_

    Why no pictures of the Haiden (Prayer Hall)?

    _x000D_
    There seems to be an inconsistent policy regarding the photographing of some of the buildings at Atsuta Shrine. When I visited, my guide specifically requested that I not take photographs of the Haiden (Pray Hall) and the Kaguraden. However pictures of these sacred buildings do appear on the internet.Atsuta Shrine (Atsuta Jingu) is thought to be the second most important shrine in Japan, second only to Ise Jingo (Ise Shrine). Atsuta Shrine is very popular, attracting over 9 million visitors annually. Atsuta Shrine was originally founded in 113AD, when the sacred sword Kusanagi-no-tsurugi, one of the Imperial symbols, was enshrined. Atsuta was chosen as the site for the shrine by Miyasuhime-no-Mikoto, wife of the then Prince Yamatotakeru-no-Mikoto, who had died leaving the sword._x000D_
    _x000D_

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine - 0864

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    Atsuta Shrine has been well supported by authorities and people over the years, to the point that it has a collection of over 4,000 relics including many National Treasures._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine - 0867

    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    During the Second World War most of the Atsuta Shrine buildings were destroy by fire. After the war the reconstruction was begun by the combined effort of all devout worshipers of the shrine all over the country. The main buildings were completed in 1955 and the remaining construction was completed in 2009._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine - 0846

    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_

    Why no pictures of the Haiden (Prayer Hall)?

    _x000D_
    There seems to be an inconsistent policy regarding the photographing of some of the buildings at Atsuta Shrine. When I visited, my guide specifically requested that I not take photographs of the Haiden (Pray Hall) and the Kaguraden. However pictures of these sacred buildings do appear on the internet.Atsuta Shrine (Atsuta Jingu) is thought to be the second most important shrine in Japan, second only to Ise Jingo (Ise Shrine). Atsuta Shrine is very popular, attracting over 9 million visitors annually. Atsuta Shrine was originally founded in 113AD, when the sacred sword Kusanagi-no-tsurugi, one of the Imperial symbols, was enshrined. Atsuta was chosen as the site for the shrine by Miyasuhime-no-Mikoto, wife of the then Prince Yamatotakeru-no-Mikoto, who had died leaving the sword._x000D_
    _x000D_

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine - 0864

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    Atsuta Shrine has been well supported by authorities and people over the years, to the point that it has a collection of over 4,000 relics including many National Treasures._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine - 0867

    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    During the Second World War most of the Atsuta Shrine buildings were destroy by fire. After the war the reconstruction was begun by the combined effort of all devout worshipers of the shrine all over the country. The main buildings were completed in 1955 and the remaining construction was completed in 2009._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine - 0846

    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_

    Why no pictures of the Haiden (Prayer Hall)?

    _x000D_
    There seems to be an inconsistent policy regarding the photographing of some of the buildings at Atsuta Shrine. When I visited, my guide specifically requested that I not take photographs of the Haiden (Pray Hall) and the Kaguraden. However pictures of these sacred buildings do appear on the internet.Atsuta Shrine (Atsuta Jingu) is thought to be the second most important shrine in Japan, second only to Ise Jingo (Ise Shrine). Atsuta Shrine is very popular, attracting over 9 million visitors annually. Atsuta Shrine was originally founded in 113AD, when the sacred sword Kusanagi-no-tsurugi, one of the Imperial symbols, was enshrined. Atsuta was chosen as the site for the shrine by Miyasuhime-no-Mikoto, wife of the then Prince Yamatotakeru-no-Mikoto, who had died leaving the sword._x000D_
    _x000D_

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine - 0864

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    Atsuta Shrine has been well supported by authorities and people over the years, to the point that it has a collection of over 4,000 relics including many National Treasures._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine - 0867

    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    During the Second World War most of the Atsuta Shrine buildings were destroy by fire. After the war the reconstruction was begun by the combined effort of all devout worshipers of the shrine all over the country. The main buildings were completed in 1955 and the remaining construction was completed in 2009._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine - 0846

    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_

    Why no pictures of the Haiden (Prayer Hall)?

    _x000D_
    There seems to be an inconsistent policy regarding the photographing of some of the buildings at Atsuta Shrine. When I visited, my guide specifically requested that I not take photographs of the Haiden (Pray Hall) and the Kaguraden. However pictures of these sacred buildings do appear on the internet.Atsuta Shrine (Atsuta Jingu) is thought to be the second most important shrine in Japan, second only to Ise Jingo (Ise Shrine). Atsuta Shrine is very popular, attracting over 9 million visitors annually. Atsuta Shrine was originally founded in 113AD, when the sacred sword Kusanagi-no-tsurugi, one of the Imperial symbols, was enshrined. Atsuta was chosen as the site for the shrine by Miyasuhime-no-Mikoto, wife of the then Prince Yamatotakeru-no-Mikoto, who had died leaving the sword._x000D_
    _x000D_

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine - 0864

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    Atsuta Shrine has been well supported by authorities and people over the years, to the point that it has a collection of over 4,000 relics including many National Treasures._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine - 0867

    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    During the Second World War most of the Atsuta Shrine buildings were destroy by fire. After the war the reconstruction was begun by the combined effort of all devout worshipers of the shrine all over the country. The main buildings were completed in 1955 and the remaining construction was completed in 2009._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine - 0846

    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_

    Why no pictures of the Haiden (Prayer Hall)?

    _x000D_
    There seems to be an inconsistent policy regarding the photographing of some of the buildings at Atsuta Shrine. When I visited, my guide specifically requested that I not take photographs of the Haiden (Pray Hall) and the Kaguraden. However pictures of these sacred buildings do appear on the internet.Atsuta Shrine (Atsuta Jingu) is thought to be the second most important shrine in Japan, second only to Ise Jingo (Ise Shrine). Atsuta Shrine is very popular, attracting over 9 million visitors annually. Atsuta Shrine was originally founded in 113AD, when the sacred sword Kusanagi-no-tsurugi, one of the Imperial symbols, was enshrined. Atsuta was chosen as the site for the shrine by Miyasuhime-no-Mikoto, wife of the then Prince Yamatotakeru-no-Mikoto, who had died leaving the sword._x000D_
    _x000D_

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine - 0864

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    Atsuta Shrine has been well supported by authorities and people over the years, to the point that it has a collection of over 4,000 relics including many National Treasures._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine - 0867

    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    During the Second World War most of the Atsuta Shrine buildings were destroy by fire. After the war the reconstruction was begun by the combined effort of all devout worshipers of the shrine all over the country. The main buildings were completed in 1955 and the remaining construction was completed in 2009._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine - 0846

    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_

    Why no pictures of the Haiden (Prayer Hall)?

    _x000D_
    There seems to be an inconsistent policy regarding the photographing of some of the buildings at Atsuta Shrine. When I visited, my guide specifically requested that I not take photographs of the Haiden (Pray Hall) and the Kaguraden. However pictures of these sacred buildings do appear on the internet.Atsuta Shrine (Atsuta Jingu) is thought to be the second most important shrine in Japan, second only to Ise Jingo (Ise Shrine). Atsuta Shrine is very popular, attracting over 9 million visitors annually. Atsuta Shrine was originally founded in 113AD, when the sacred sword Kusanagi-no-tsurugi, one of the Imperial symbols, was enshrined. Atsuta was chosen as the site for the shrine by Miyasuhime-no-Mikoto, wife of the then Prince Yamatotakeru-no-Mikoto, who had died leaving the sword._x000D_
    _x000D_

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine - 0864

    West Torii Gate, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    Atsuta Shrine has been well supported by authorities and people over the years, to the point that it has a collection of over 4,000 relics including many National Treasures._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine - 0867

    Swords, Bunka-den, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_
    _x000D_
    During the Second World War most of the Atsuta Shrine buildings were destroy by fire. After the war the reconstruction was begun by the combined effort of all devout worshipers of the shrine all over the country. The main buildings were completed in 1955 and the remaining construction was completed in 2009._x000D_
    _x000D_
    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine - 0846

    Minami Shingusha, Atsuta Shrine

    _x000D_

    Why no pictures of the Haiden (Prayer Hall)?

    _x000D_
    There seems to be an inconsistent policy regarding the photographing of some of the buildings at Atsuta Shrine. When I visited, my guide specifically requested that I not take photographs of the Haiden (Pray Hall) and the Kaguraden. However pictures of these sacred buildings do appear on the internet.

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  • Reviews
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    1 Review on “Atsuta Shrine”

    1. Profile photo of Craig FryerCraig Fryer Post authorAtsuta Shrine
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      I found it frustrating that I was not allowed to photograph some of the key buildings, even though some of these buildings appear in publications and on the internet including the shrine’s official site. This really took away from my enjoyment of the shrine.

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